Date   

Units on Bern-Luzern RE trains in new timetable

Martin Baumann
 

ex RM Stadler GTW
3344 2057 Luzern-Bern
3343 2236 Bern-Luzern

ex RM RBDe 566
3337 1936 Bern-Luzern
3346 2157 Luzern-Bern


SBB loco changes

Martin Baumann
 

11184 withdrawn
11437 withdrawn
11442 withdrawn
11487 withdrawn (610 487)
16396 withdrawn


Re: New file uploaded to SwissRail- BLS Loco Diagrams

Don
 

Thanks to Keith for his efforts and for posting the information for our benefit. Cheers, Don

Uploaded by : keith47424 <keith47424@...>
Description : New BLS loco hauled diagrams Winter 2012


New file uploaded to SwissRail

SwissRail@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the SwissRail
group.

File : /Loco Hauled Diagrams/Swiss Diagrams 2012 - 2013 /bls w2012-2013.zip
Uploaded by : keith47424 <keith47424@sky.com>
Description : New BLS loco hauled diagrams Winter 2012

You can access this file at the URL:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SwissRail/files/Loco%20Hauled%20Diagrams/Swiss%20Diagrams%202012%20-%202013%20/bls%20w2012-2013.zip

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.html
Regards,

keith47424 <keith47424@sky.com>


Re: Apple and the SBB clock

Krist van Besien
 

On Sat, Dec 8, 2012 at 10:27 AM, timngoodwin <timngoodwin@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
The key distinction is between patents and copyrights. Patents generally cover physical objects or processes. A patent normally offers exclusivity for the inventor in a particular geographical area, for a fee, for a particular length of time.
Yes, but I was talking about design patents, not a patent on an
invention. They are different from copyrights. They cover what is
called the "ornamental design of a functional item", and I would think
that the SBB clock is exactly that. Copyright is for "non functional
items", so would not apply here.
Maybe that's also what Apple's lawyers' thought. That the design
patent of the clock must have expired long ago. However, SBB
apparently managed to trademark it, which I find a bit odd...

Krist

--
krist.vanbesien@gmail.com
krist@vanbesien.org
Bern, Switzerland


Re: Apple and the SBB clock

csipromo
 

The iPhone app ask for permission to access your location information and then updates the clock to the appropriate time zone,

The advantage of the iPad version is that is the default time application which is displayed when the device is on standby.

MC


Re: Apple and the SBB clock

John Lovda
 

The only problem with the SBB download (from my memory, its been awhile) is that the clock is locked to Swiss local time and cannot be reset to another time zone such as US Eastern Standard time. Is is also true for the clock that can be inserted into a webpage.


Re: BBC Great Continental Railway Journeys

Andrew Moglestue
 

I've only just managed to watch this program, which is why I am only now entering the discussion.

Actually, i don't see what all the fuss is about. I thought it was a strikingly good programme, well above most of what the BBC does these days and no doubt a great advertisement for bringing railfans to Switzerland.

Of course not everything was strictly speaking correct and some rather "normal" things got praised above their value, and not all the footage was filmed where it was claimed to have been filmd. But one the whole these mistakes were more for pedants to point out and nothing was seriously misrepresented. On the contrary, the program accurately portrays Switzerland and was very well put together.

Andrew


Re: Apple and the SBB clock

OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 09.12.2012 10:57, schrieb timngoodwin:
In any case, I wish Google would do the same as Apple and create an
Android version :-)
Apple's licence is only for iPad

iPhone owners still have a short time to get the SwissRailwayClock app from the iTunes store. It must disappear on 24th December 2012.

<https://itunes.apple.com/ch/app/swissrailwayclock/id306098880?mt=8&affId=1881396&ign-mpt=uo%3D4>

And then, there is still the official screensaver from SBB for free download:

<http://www.sbb.ch/en/leisure-holidays/allgemeine-informationen/wallpaper-en/sbb-uhr.html>

Markus, G�rbetal


Re: Apple and the SBB clock

Max Wyss
 

Secondly, does this mean that all of the other railway companies in Switzerland have to ask SBB for a licence to use the clock design at their stations?
From what I believe to remember reading, the SBB did grant a licence
to the maker of station clocks. However, I don't know any details
about that licence, but it could be that it is limited to Switzerland.
And then, it could cover non-SBB stations as well.

Max.


EC 193 on 17th October

Martin Baumann
 

The folowing is reported in the new edition of SCHWEIZER EISENBAHN REVUE:

On 17.10.2012 Zürich sent EC 193 on its way hauled by 11133 by mistake. It obviously had to come off the train at St Margrethen although the train already had a green signal to go to Bregenz when the driver reported the fact. As a result SBB had to phone Vienna ! for a replacement loco (which only had to come from Wolfurt near Bregenz) This resulted in ÖBB 1063.050 working 193 from St Margrethen to Lindau and 194 back

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Apple and the SBB clock

timngoodwin
 

--- In SwissRail@yahoogroups.com, "csipromo" <csipromo@...> wrote:

The clock is registered as a trademark, an image that is associated with the company (the brand), similar to the way that the M is associated with Migros or with McDonald's depending on the design.

Regards

Mike C
This is itself quite interesting. Trademarks for a logo or brand are sought when there is a strong association to a particular product or organisation. Does the Swiss railways clock associate with SBB in people's mind, or with Switzerland? For me it's the latter.

Secondly, does this mean that all of the other railway companies in Switzerland have to ask SBB for a licence to use the clock design at their stations?

In any case, I wish Google would do the same as Apple and create an Android version :-)

Regards,
Tim.


Re: Apple and the SBB clock

csipromo
 

The clock is registered as a trademark, an image that is associated with the company (the brand), similar to the way that the M is associated with Migros or with McDonald's depending on the design.

Regards

Mike C


Re: Apple and the SBB clock

OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 08.12.2012 10:27, schrieb timngoodwin:
Presumably, the rights to the Swiss railways clock are owned by SBB, not
the estate of Hans Hilfiker, the original designer, who was working for SBB at the time.

Yes, see (English/German/French/Italian)

https://www.swissreg.ch/srclient/en/tm/P-512830
https://www.swissreg.ch/srclient/de/tm/P-512830
https://www.swissreg.ch/srclient/fr/tm/P-512830
https://www.swissreg.ch/srclient/it/tm/P-512830


Re: Apple and the SBB clock

timngoodwin
 

--- In SwissRail@yahoogroups.com, Markus <guerbetaler@...> wrote:

Am 07.12.2012 08:25, schrieb Krist van Besien:
I'm not a lawyer, but I wonder. I thought design patents expired after
20 years, just like normal patents.
Something like that, yes. But SBB was clever enough to find other ways
to protect the image. I'm also not a lawyer but think I understood that
they can register it as brand ("Markenschutz").

Markus, Gürbetal
The key distinction is between patents and copyrights. Patents generally cover physical objects or processes. A patent normally offers exclusivity for the inventor in a particular geographical area, for a fee, for a particular length of time.

A copyright covers artistic works and in most jurisdictions remains with the author/creator for his/her life (and sometimes for a period after their death). This means they have sole rights to sell and/or reproduce a design/image/text as they wish.

What I don't understand, and perhaps someone can provide clarity, is when a copyright is owned by an organisation, not an individual. Presumably, the rights to the Swiss railways clock are owned by SBB, not the estate of Hans Hilfiker, the original designer, who was working for SBB at the time.

Regards,
Tim.


Re: BBC Great Continental Railway Journeys

Bill Bolton
 

On Fri, 7 Dec 2012 04:38:55 +0100, Dave Edmondston wrote:

I think we all know what Duncan is saying.
There is simply no way that can be "accurate" statement......

<rolling eyes>

Cheers,

Bill


Re: Apple and the SBB clock

Guerbetaler
 

Am 07.12.2012 08:25, schrieb Krist van Besien:
I'm not a lawyer, but I wonder. I thought design patents expired after
20 years, just like normal patents.
Something like that, yes. But SBB was clever enough to find other ways to protect the image. I'm also not a lawyer but think I understood that they can register it as brand ("Markenschutz").

Markus, G�rbetal


Re: Apple and the SBB clock

Krist van Besien
 

On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 9:46 PM, Guerbetaler <muesche2-swissrail@yahoo.de> wrote:
And why do you think they should? Mondaine has an SBB license to copy
their design for watches and Apple now has a license to copy their
design to show the time on a screen. SBB kept the rights of their design
for real station clocks. Now?
I'm not a lawyer, but I wonder. I thought design patents expired after
20 years, just like normal patents.

Krist

--
krist.vanbesien@gmail.com
krist@vanbesien.org
Bern, Switzerland


Re: BBC Great Continental Railway Journeys

Dave Edmondston <davee@...>
 

Without the need for dictionary definitions, I think we all know what Duncan is saying. I would agree that a factual programme should try and ensure accuracy, especially for the tax funded BBC.


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: BBC Great Continental Railway Journeys

Bill Bolton
 

On Thu, 6 Dec 2012 08:46:24 +0000, Duncan wrote:

The BBC classify it as "Factual" on the iPlayer so that would
seem to oblige them to ensure its accuracy.
<sigh>

Being "factual" does not automatically imply strict "accuracy".

"Factual" means:

concerned with what is actually the case; actually
occurring (ED)

"Fictional" means:

relating to or occurring in fiction; invented for the
purposes of fiction (OED)

The use of "factual" by the BBC, and broadcasters globally for that
matter, is to clearly indicate the antithesis of "fictional".


"Accuracy" means:

the quality or state of being correct or precise (OED)

Very little visual imagery *of any sort*, except perhaps material
specifically produced for forensic (or similar) purposes, is strictly
"correct or precise", and in that sense it is really no different from
written or spoken material.

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