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Re: How mobile are mobile substations ...

John Beaulieu
 

Amtrak boosted the voltage on their 25Hz system from 11kV to 12kV in 1976.

On Wed, Jun 24, 2015 at 4:41 PM, Guerbetaler muesche2-swissrail@yahoo.de
[SwissRail] <SwissRail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Am 24.06.2015 um 12:37 schrieb chris_j_wood@yahoo.com [SwissRail]:
(and likewise the single remaining 25 Hz electrification)
So should I look out for a mobile sub-station when I visit the
Mariazellerbahn?.

oops, sorry, forgot the Mariazellerbahn. But in fact they have their own
power lines, they are 27 kV 25 Hz while the catenary is fed with 6.5 kV
25 Hz.

What I meant was New York - Phialdelphia - Washington which is
electrifeid at 11 kV 25 Hz. Their transmission lines are at 138 kV.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amtrak%27s_25_Hz_traction_power_system>

So we have two remaining systems with 25 Hz. Howevere, I'm not aware of
mobile substations on theses systems...

Markus, Gürbetal


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Re: How mobile are mobile substations ...

OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 24.06.2015 um 12:37 schrieb chris_j_wood@yahoo.com [SwissRail]:
(and likewise the single remaining 25 Hz electrification)
So should I look out for a mobile sub-station when I visit the Mariazellerbahn?.
oops, sorry, forgot the Mariazellerbahn. But in fact they have their own power lines, they are 27 kV 25 Hz while the catenary is fed with 6.5 kV 25 Hz.

What I meant was New York - Phialdelphia - Washington which is electrifeid at 11 kV 25 Hz. Their transmission lines are at 138 kV.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amtrak%27s_25_Hz_traction_power_system>

So we have two remaining systems with 25 Hz. Howevere, I'm not aware of mobile substations on theses systems...

Markus, Gürbetal


Re: How mobile are mobile substations ...

Chris Wood
 

Markus writes:

> The special thing about 16.7 Hz electrifications is that there is usually a
> network of high voltage power lines separately from the national 50 Hz
> grid. Thus the railways own the high voltage (132 or 110 kV) lines.

That is a good point, which I hadn't consider. I guess that this ownership makes it easier (politically, if not technically) to just turn up a convenient point with a mobile substation and start attaching it to the high voltage wiring.

Whereas doing something similar on a 50Hz electrified railway would involve the railway company attaching to a national grid owned by somebody else. Cue all sorts of legalities and authorisations that would negate any time saved by having your substation on wheels.

> (and likewise the single remaining 25 Hz electrification)

So should I look out for a mobile sub-station when I visit the Mariazellerbahn?. ;-)


Re: How mobile are mobile substations ...

OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 22.06.2015 um 13:50 schrieb Bill Bolton:
Its just 'business as usual' for electric railways!
The principles may be similar, but the means are different. I'm not aware of mobile substations outside the 16.7 Hz electrifications but would be glad to learn about such vehicles elsewhere.

The special thing about 16.7 Hz electrifications (and likewise the single remaining 25 Hz electrification) is that there is usually a network of high voltage power lines separately from the national 50 Hz grid. Thus the railways own the high voltage (132 or 110 kV) lines.

Markus, G�rbetal


Luzern train diversions in August and September

Martin Baumann
 

REPOST WITH CORRECTED DATES


On 15 and 16.08 and 26 and 27.09 Luzern-Zürich Flughafen and return trains will run nonstop from Luzern to Zürich as Rotkreuz to Cham will be closed. They will arrive and depart in the Löwenstrasse part of Zürich HB and run via the DML to Oerlikon. Part of this will include what is currently non passenger track between Zürich Vorbahnhof and the DML but which will have regular S-Bahn service (S14) from December. Although not stated the trains probably run via Zofingen-Olten-Aarau as otherwise reversal would be required at Rotkreuz to run via Rotkreuz-Wohlen


Re: Major disruption in west

Martin Baumann
 

Normal service is expected to resume tomorrow. The fire broke out in the basement during building work. It does not appear to have damaged signaling or other vital equipment


Re: Major disruption in west

Martin Baumann
 

The fire was in the control centre in Lausanne:

http://www.20min.ch/schweiz/romandie/story/Brand-legt-Bahnhof-Lausanne-lahm-17701128

Time of call to being declared under control was only 18 minutes but even small fires in signalling installations can have long term affects. One in Vienna in 2009 caused six months of disruption


Major disruption in west

Martin Baumann
 

"Due to a fire" (It is not stated where but probably connected with signalling) All trains in the area Genève / Lausanne / Biel// Fribourg are subject to delay and cancellation until further notice

www.sbb.ch/166


Re: How mobile are mobile substations ...

Bill Bolton
 

On Sun, 21 Jun 2015 15:24:32 +0200, Markus wrote:

According to Paul Winter, "Schweizer Bahnen unter Fahnen.Die Geschichte
des Militär-Eisenbahndienstes" the original idea was to increase
availability of electric current in exceptional situations......
I wont quote the whole reply, but what Markus has posted generally
represents the long term operational practice of multiple electric
rail operations around the world, for over a century.

Its just 'business as usual' for electric railways!

Cheers,

Bill

Bill Bolton
Sydney, Australia


Re: How mobile are mobile substations ...

Andrew Moglestue
 

There are different shades of mobile.

These substations are built specifically so they can fit inside the railway loading gauge and hence be moved by rail.

For some strange reason this is a useful property for bringing stuff to railway connected locations.

The alternative would be something you would have to lift into place with a heavy crane and move by road.

In many railway locations this is the less viable option.

If you look at the track they are standing on, you often see this is not connected to the main line, but often a short length
of track not connected to anything. Moving such a unit in or out would thgus require laying a temporary track or tempoarily
slewing the main track.

Thus being mobile does not imply that they move around frequently but that if needed they can be moved by rail.

Of course its not a question of plugging in a wire or two. As you rightly say, they are quite difficult to connect.

But if there was a to be a catastrophic failure and one needed to be replaced, this would still be an acceptable solution.


Re: How mobile are mobile substations ...

OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 20.06.2015 um 20:54 schrieb chris_j_wood@yahoo.com [SwissRail]:
Can anybody explain why these devices exist, and how often and in
what circumstances they do move?
According to Paul Winter, "Schweizer Bahnen unter Fahnen.Die Geschichte des Militär-Eisenbahndienstes" the original idea was to increase availability of electric current in exceptional situations. At that time (1956-58) warlike events were in the foreground. Thus the army co-financed the purchase of the first ten mobile substations 1968-86.

Mobile substations can be used in pre-defined and prepared places or at places, where it is possible to make provisional installations from a nearby 132 kV, 66 kV or 33 kV power line. Basic function is to transform voltage to 15 kV.

Mobile substations are used

- as temporary replacements for fix substations in case of defects or need for overhaul;
- as temporary additions for expected high but temporary traffic density;
- as first step of a new substation
- as long-term solution at places where the performance is sufficient
- as a simple means to avoid investments abroad, e.g. Varzo (between Iselle and Domodossola), if necessary by putting more than one mobile substation in that place, as in Varzo;

From this you can see that there are mobile substations that often move and others that remain for years. But even these substations have a periodic need for overhaul.

some sightings:

Xaa 80 85 9403 113-6
Gampel-Steg 15./16.02.07
Blausee-Mitholz 28.03.07 [5R1 MEQ 09.01.03]
Sargans 30.05.07
Ziegelbrücke 20.06.08/MG
Frauenfeld
Dübendorf 28.12.08

Xaa 80 85 9403 114-4
Varzo

Xaa 80 85 9403 115-1 "H16.92"
Gland 2005
Uetendorf 17.05.12
(no longer in Uetendorf)

Markus, Gürbetal


How mobile are mobile substations ...

Chris Wood
 

A recent press report states that the SBB is updating the 18 mobile substations around its network, by replacing the existing control vehicles (converted from passenger coaches) with 40ft containers on wagons.

I've obviously seen these devices around the Swiss rail network, but they have never struck me as particularly mobile. Yes they are on wheels on track, but they appeared to pretty-well hard-wired into the electricity supply and overhead lines. I'd always assumed they just represented a frugal way of creating a sub-station, rather than being expected to be mobile.

But the fact that the new container versions are going to be on wagons suggests a much greater degree of mobility than I previously thought. After all, 40ft containers are designed to be picked up off the ground and moved with relative ease, so putting them on a wagon almost implies rapid response.

Can anybody explain why these devices exist, and how often and in what circumstances they do move?.


Re: Locomotive fire on May 14th in Lausanne

csipromo
 

According to what I found, the incident started shortly before midnight and was under control by 2 AM local time. In another incident related to an earlier derailment:
What is of more concern is the acid that was recovered from the Daillens accident site and was then transported to Lausanne and then on to Basel in a tank car that was not at all designed to hold acid. By the time the train arrived in Basel, fire and hazmat crews had to be called because the acid was eating away at the metal body of the tank and generating heat and hydrogen that could have exploded if not properly vented and evacuated.


Regards


Mike C


Re: Locomotive fire on May 14th in Lausanne

gordonwis
 

I have looked at the media reports and it would make a lot of sense that the rescue services were nearby, as it would appear that the loco caught fire on the western approach to Lausanne station, therefore it sounds to me as if the loco caught fire pretty much opposite where the Lausanne fire/rescue train unit is always stabled.

The media reports all have bold headlines on the fact that the freight being hauled was 'dangerous' so I assume it was one of the oil trains that frequent the Denges - Aigle route.

One last minor point date-wise is that the incident seems to have happened at 23.30 on Wednesday 13 May, and was over within the first few minutes of the 14th May.


Re: Locomotive fire on May 14th in Lausanne

csipromo
 

Thanks for the information. Among the information that was available in the media, it stated that the Lausanne fire train was nearby and responded immediately, minimizing the damage.

Regards


Mike C


Re: Locomotive fire on May 14th in Lausanne

Martin Baumann
 

11290 only minor damage


Locomotive fire on May 14th in Lausanne

csipromo
 

Does anybody have any information about which locomotive was involved in the fire of May 14, 2015 near Lausanne?


Regards


Mike C


Re: Narrow gauge line in Oerlikon

csipromo
 

MFO manufactured both normal gauge but also narrow gauges. There would have been some trackage so that they could get narrow gauge material from the factory to wherever it was loaded on normal gauge rolling stock to get it to the point of delivery.

Regards


MIke C


Ee 3/3 16388

Martin Baumann
 

16388 was noted shunting at Zürich HB today. It had a TK in Zürich 13.06.2015.

TK means TECHNISCHE KONTROLLE and has to be undertaken if a loco or other vehicle does not run the required number of km for a Revision 1 2 or 3 within a specified time to ensure the continuation of safe operation

Last overhaul for 16388 was R1 Yverdon 01.04.1998


Re: Narrow gauge line in Oerlikon

Bill Bolton
 

On 17 Jun 2015 02:51:11 -0700, Chris wrote:

Decauville did originally make portable 400mm gauge
railways
The extensive Woolwich Arsenal industrial light railway in the UK was
457mm gauge, and used mechanical power (steam locos).

http://www.irsociety.co.uk/Archives/55/Hector.htm

Cheers,

Bill

Bill Bolton
Sydney, Australia

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