RhB 703 accident


Martin Baumann <martinbaumann112@...>
 

Collision at Rueun today. A freight hauled by Ge 6/6 II 703 ran into a flat wagon and tractor (Tm) which were waiting in the loop. The driver of 703 and three staff on the tractor were injured and taken to hospital.

Although the angle of the photo at the link below may be deceptive, it seems 703 has a bent frame. This might mean the loco being withdrawn

Martin Baumann

Pictures and article in German:

http://www.blick.ch/news/schweiz/graubuenden/rueun-gr-gueterzug-knallt-in-schienentraktor-187752


Illya Vaes
 

2011/11/22 Martin Baumann <martinbaumann112@yahoo.co.uk>
Although the angle of the photo at the link below may be deceptive,
it seems 703 has a bent frame.
Do you mean the angle at the articulation or do you see another
point where it's bent?
Though an articulation might also be vulnerable point, it's usually
made to allow bending :-)


Tim Hall <kalyr@...>
 

On 22/11/2011 20:32, Illya Vaes wrote:
Do you mean the angle at the articulation or do you see another
point where it's bent?
Though an articulation might also be vulnerable point, it's usually
made to allow bending
I was thinking that - The Ge6/6ii is supposed to bend in the middle, and the bend is vertical, not horizontal.

--

Tim Hall
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Gordon Wiseman <gordonwis@...>
 

I see what you mean but could it just be the way the articulation has
reacted to the shock?
Might it be a bit like my N scale Hobbytrain BLS Ae8/8 which needs to be
handled carefully to ensure that the articulation arrangement sits
correctly when taking the model out of the box and placing it on the track?
At times it can seem 'broken' but then when you carefully readjust the body
it sits back into the correct position.


Krist van Besien
 

On Tue, Nov 22, 2011 at 9:48 PM, Tim Hall <kalyr@clara.co.uk> wrote:
On 22/11/2011 20:32, Illya Vaes wrote:
Do you mean the angle at the articulation or do you see another
point where it's bent?
Though an articulation might also be vulnerable point, it's usually
made to allow bending
I was thinking that - The Ge6/6ii is supposed to bend in the middle, and
the bend is vertical, not horizontal.
But shouldn't the articulation be able to bend vertically too?

Krist


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Neil Aitken <neilaitken.aphra@...>
 

--- In SwissRail@yahoogroups.com, Gordon Wiseman <gordonwis@...> wrote:

I see what you mean but could it just be the way the articulation has
reacted to the shock?
I agree. It looks to me as though the front of the loco is resting on the snowplough which has been pushed down by the force of the collision and forced the front half of the loco up in the air.

When that is corrected I would say that the loco will be sitting normally and the frame will be okay although the joint between the two sections might required some attention if it's been overstressed.

Neil


klauskempkens <klaus.kempkens@...>
 

I could imagine it is not that critical. The loco design is supposed to allow vertical bending. The crash was frontally, and apparently at slow speed - damage to the loco body as well as to the freight car coupled to the tractor is not that large, and even the windows are not broken.

Hence I would expect that only the loco front bogie (to which the coupler is attached which first takes the crash energy) has faced serious damage, but not the loco frame itself.

Then, doesn't the RhB have spare bogies ? (Maybe even from Ge 4/4 Is ?).

Klaus

--- In SwissRail@yahoogroups.com, Krist van Besien <krist.vanbesien@...> wrote:

On Tue, Nov 22, 2011 at 9:48 PM, Tim Hall <kalyr@...> wrote:
On 22/11/2011 20:32, Illya Vaes wrote:
Do you mean the angle at the articulation or do you see another
point where it's bent?
Though an articulation might also be vulnerable point, it's usually
made to allow bending
I was thinking that - The Ge6/6ii is supposed to bend in the middle, and
the bend is vertical, not horizontal.
But shouldn't the articulation be able to bend vertically too?

Krist


--
krist.vanbesien@...
krist@...
Bremgarten b. Bern, Switzerland
--
A: It reverses the normal flow of conversation.
Q: What's wrong with top-posting?
A: Top-posting.
Q: What's the biggest scourge on plain text email discussions?


martinbaumann112 <martinbaumann112@...>
 

Latest information (from Bahnforum) ist that 703 has been taken to Landquart works by road and that both bogies remain at Rueun station

Martin Baumann


tudor erich
 

Latest information (from Bahnforum) ist that 703 has been taken to
Landquart works by road and that both bogies remain at Rueun station
I thought these were three bogie machines?
 
Bernard


OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 24.11.2011 20:30, schrieb martinbaumann112:
Latest information (from Bahnforum) ist that 703 has been taken to
Landquart works by road and that both bogies remain at Rueun station
My understanding of this source was that the two bogies that remained in Rueun had been replaced by reserve bogies for Ge 4/4 I. The remark about the lorry was a joke from a lorry driver.

Please read carefully before posting ...

Markus, Gürbetal


John Lovda
 

I have an acquaintance who is an engineer that designs coaches at Landquart. (He lets me take pictures at the roundhouse). From what he knows now, the front bogie was totaled. The bogies are still at the accident site but the body has been moved by truck back to Landquart. He will keep me updated.

Also, it has always bee my understanding that the body is NOT articulated even though it looks like it.

John Lovda


Guerbetaler
 

Am 25.11.2011 17:59, schrieb jlovda:
Also, it has always bee my understanding that the body is NOT
articulated even though it looks like it.
It depends, on what you call an articulation...

The Ge 6/6 II carbody doesn't follow curves but it follows grade changes. As Re 6/6 11601 and 02 do.

Markus, Gürbetal


Tim Hall <kalyr@...>
 

On 25/11/2011 19:14, Markus wrote:
The Ge 6/6 II carbody doesn't follow curves but it follows grade
changes. As Re 6/6 11601 and 02 do
Is reason so the adhesive weight on each axle remains constant during grade changes?

--

Tim Hall
Weblog -> http://www.kalyr.com/weblog
Twitter -> http://twitter.com/kalyr
RPG blog -> http://www.kalyr.com/rpg


OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 25.11.2011 20:27, schrieb Tim Hall:
On 25/11/2011 19:14, Markus wrote:
The Ge 6/6 II carbody doesn't follow curves but it follows grade
changes. As Re 6/6 11601 and 02 do
Is reason so the adhesive weight on each axle remains constant during
grade changes?
Exactly, but with the Re 6/6 11603 and 04 prototypes it was found that springs can do the same, making the carbody simpler. Same development was seen in Italy.

Markus, Gürbetal


Tim Hall <kalyr@...>
 

On 25/11/2011 19:38, Guerbetaler wrote:
Exactly, but with the Re 6/6 11603 and 04 prototypes it was found that
springs can do the same, making the carbody simpler. Same development
was seen in Italy.
I know the Re6/6 was later, but does the Ge6/6ii have to cope with vertical grade changes in excess of anything a standard-gauge loco needs to?
--

Tim Hall
Weblog -> http://www.kalyr.com/weblog
Twitter -> http://twitter.com/kalyr
RPG blog -> http://www.kalyr.com/rpg


markyboyellis <markyboyellis@...>
 

--- In SwissRail@yahoogroups.com, Guerbetaler <muesche2-swissrail@...> wrote:

Am 24.11.2011 20:30, schrieb martinbaumann112:
Latest information (from Bahnforum) ist that 703 has been taken to
Landquart works by road and that both bogies remain at Rueun station
My understanding of this source was that the two bogies that remained in
Rueun had been replaced by reserve bogies for Ge 4/4 I. The remark about
the lorry was a joke from a lorry driver.

Please read carefully before posting ...

Markus, Gürbetal
It's probably a long standing joke here in England. Due to track access charges loco's are regularly moved by road for various reasons as it's cheaper.I hope the Swiss aren't going down that road.

Mark Ellis