Dates of Zurich HbF additions


John Lovda
 

I am trying to date some old slides. Does anyone know the approximate time (year) that the main roofs of the station were extended to cover tracks 3 and 18?


Thanks,
John Lovda


OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 05.02.2015 20:43, schrieb jlovda@yahoo.com [SwissRail]:
I am trying to date some old slides. Does anyone know the approximate
time (year) that the main roofs of the station were extended to cover
tracks 3 and 18?
Must have been around 1990, when old tracks 1 through 16 became 3 through 17 with old number 9 removed and a new 18 added. At the same time new tracks 21 through 24, now 41 through 44 were added.

Markus, G�rbetal


Martin Baumann
 

On 28.05.1989 platforms 1 to 8 were renumbered 4 to 11 original 9 was closed and 10 to 16 were renumbered 12 to 18


Platform 3, planned as Platform 0 ,was opened in April 1990, the exact date does not seem to have been recorded


SZU Platforms 1 and 2 opened 05.05.1990


Platforms 21 to 24 opened on 28.05.1989 but these formed two separate lots of terminal platforms with no through running. This was commissioned 17.05.1990 with the full S-Bahn service starting 27.05.1990

Platforms 53 and 54 opened 16.06.2002

Platforms 51 and 52 opened 14.12.2003


21 to 24 were renumbered 41 to 44 on 14.05.2012


(SZU) 1 and 2 were renumbered 21 and 22 on 15.12.2013


51 was closed 14.12.2013
52 to 54 were closed 14.06.2014 with 31 to 34 opening the following day (Durchmesserlinie)


All dates are either the first or last day of timetable services, official openings or preview trains are not taken into account


csipromo
 

Martin,

thanks for the information. I was in Zurich in 1985 and then not again until 1998. I do remember that the HB was under renovations in 1985, with expansion of Shopville and the underground "durchgangsbahnhof". I think that there were already notifications that Platform 9 was closing when I was there. If I remember correctly, that was the platform between two other tracks that was mainly used by the Mirage trainsets.


How many platforms were added as part of the Sihlpost expansion?


What about the current Loewenstrasse expansion? That's the Durchmesserlinie I guess.


Regards


Mike C


Andrew Moglestue
 

I disagree with Markus.

I first visited Zürich in 1991 and I clearly remember the old roof structures still being in place then.

I'm guessing the present ones were put in in some time between 1992 and 1994.

They only began on this after the temporary upstairs ticket office in the traverse hall had been dismantled and all the temporary structures in the main hall removed and the Brasserie restored.

Andrew


Chris Wood
 

Mike C asks:

How many platforms were added as part of the Sihlpost expansion?
Four. These are the platforms 51-54 that Martin refers to above. All now gone again.

What about the current Loewenstrasse expansion? That's the Durchmesserlinie I guess.
Again, four. These are the 31-34 in Martin's reply. The platforms and the Weinberg Tunnel to Oerlikon are now open, but the partly elevated route that allows better access for trains from the Altstetten direction to them is still under construction.


Regards


Mike C


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 06.02.2015 um 09:38 schrieb amogles@yahoo.com [SwissRail]:
I disagree with Markus.
No you don't. You are more precise. :-)

I first visited Zürich in 1991 and I clearly remember the old roof
structures still being in place then. I'm guessing the present ones
were put in in some time between 1992 and 1994. They only began on
this after the temporary upstairs ticket office in the traverse hall
had been dismantled and all the temporary structures in the main hall
removed and the Brasserie restored.
The whole rebuild must have been a 10-year-or-so work. This is why I said "around 1990". I agree that the roof parts were done as the last work. So the years you mention may be correct.

Markus, Gürbetal


OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 06.02.2015 um 14:32 schrieb chris_j_wood@yahoo.com [SwissRail]:
Mike C asks:
How many platforms were added as part of the Sihlpost expansion?
Four. These are the platforms 51-54 that Martin refers to above. All
now gone again.
In my counting there are two platforms with four tracks :-)

In fact, there are no more platform numbers today but there had been. Nowadays all information refers to tracks ("Gleis 51"). This is why you often find the information "Gleis 41/42" which means it is on the platform with track 41 and 42.

(sorry for the rant)

Markus, Gürbetal


Martin Baumann
 

The roof on Gleis 18 was completed in 1997:


http://www.luechingermeyer.ch/it/node/166


John Lovda
 

Martin: Thank you. That was pretty close to my guess. I have a photo of the Ae 6/6 Graubunden in green sitting on that track that I will be comparing to the restored version I saw about four years ago at Arth-Goldau.


John


Chris Wood
 

Markus writes:

In my counting there are two platforms with four tracks :-)
I stand corrected. I answered a Swiss question using British terminology.

In Britain we say we number platforms, but we actually number "edges of platforms at which trains stop to embark or disembark passengers". I can see why it got shortened.

In Switzerland, they say they number tracks. I've never quite resolved the question as to whether they actually do, or whether they actually number "tracks at which trains stop to embark or disembark passengers".


Martin Baumann
 

In Swiss stations tracks are numbered from 1 up going away from the station building ("Aufnahmegebäude") and these will not necessarily have a platform. For instance in Zürich Altstetten you have the S-Bahn platforms 3 and 4 on tracks 3 and 4 (In Britain these would be referred to as the slow lines) then track 5 which is a through line with no platform then mainline tracks 6 and 7 with platforms 6 and 7

(The tracks next to the Altstetten station building have an unusual layout. Track one is never in regular use as it is built into the platform for track 2 in tramway style. This platform is lower than the four main platforms and is only used for three terminating peak hour trains Monday to Friday- LION sets on 19120 19124 19126 )


George Raymond
 

The tracks next to the Altstetten station building have an unusual layout. Track one is never in regular use as it is built into the platform for track 2 in tramway style.
Once sometime in the period 2000-2003 I did see some equipment move slowly along track 1, watching for pedestrians.

George


Martin Baumann
 

"In Swiss stations tracks are numbered from 1 up going away from the station building"


There are occaisional exceptions where a track has been removed or renumbered. Winterthur for instance had platforms and tracks 1 to 7 renumbered 3 to 9 on 28.05.1989. The Bay Platform commissioned in 1980 was renumbered from 11 to 2 on that date and there was no platform/track 1 until 10.06.2001 when a former postal siding next to track 2 was converted to a second Bay, (These are used for local trains towards Wil and Bauma)


OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 08.02.2015 um 21:27 schrieb martin98baumann@outlook.com [SwissRail]:
"In Swiss stations tracks are numbered from 1 up going away from the
station building" -- There are occaisional exceptions where a track
has been removed or renumbered.
Don't forget Montreux, where you depart to Vevey on track 1 and come back on track 3, although there is no space between the two tracks. In fact, track 1 was removed and the platform edge put forward to track 2 which was renumbered 1, but n° 3 remained. Tracks 4 etc. are narrow gauge (MOB, MVR).

Markus, Gürbetal


bs177@...
 

"---In SwissRail@yahoogroups.com, <geor@...> wrote :

Once sometime in the period 2000-2003 I did see some equipment move slowly along track 1, watching for pedestrians.

George"

I saw an instruction carriage/mobile classroom parked there when I visited last autumn, and traktors going to and from the adjacent sidings use it.
b


OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 08.02.2015 um 20:51 schrieb chris_j_wood@yahoo.com [SwissRail]:
In Switzerland, they say they number tracks. I've never quite
resolved the question as to whether they actually do, or whether they
actually number "tracks at which trains stop to embark or disembark
passengers".
We do count the tracks, not only the "tracks at which trains stop to embark or disembark passengers".

In a brochure about the then new Bern railway station (1965) I found a description and photo from where I can deduct:
- in the underpass only platform numbers 1 through 6 were indicated;
- each platform with two tracks served one destination, because there were no dynamic information systems then.

Platform 1 (track 1/2) was for Fribourg
Platform 2 (track 3/4) was for Luzern
Platform 3 (track 5/6) was for Thun
Platform 4 (track 7/8) was for Olten
Platform 5 (track 9/10) was for Biel
Platform 6 (track 12/13) was for BN/GBS

BN/GBS are the lines for Neuchâtel, Schwarzenburg and Belp-Thun.
You will note that track 11 has no platform (but exists!)
The track numbers are still the same, but the platform numbers are long gone. Thanks to dynamic information systems...

Markus, Gürbetal


Chris Wood
 

Martin wrote:

The tracks next to the Altstetten station building have an unusual layout. Track one is never in regular
use as it is built into the platform for track 2 in tramway style.
That doesn't seem that unusual for Swiss stations. Wollishofen, for example, has (or perhaps had) the same layout. Pretty sure I've seen it elsewhere too, although my memory is failing me for where.

Always wondered why you would do that. I guess it is probably a hang-over from the very early days, when maybe platforms 1 and 2 where all there were.


Andrew Moglestue
 

While on the topic of platform and track numbering

My impression is that the track set tram style in the platform surface as seen at Altstetten
is in fact quite common, or was in the older style of stations, with this track being useful for
shunting and also accessing the goods shed which typically in smaller stations was attached to or
at least adjacent to the main building.

This is in contrast to Germany where the goods shed track would typically end at a buffer stop
rather than running in front of the station building. Thus it was more complicated to shunt
wagons onto that track.

In Britain, the goods shed was typically totally separate from the main building and thus
this problem didn't occur.

Typically (in CH) passenger trains would stop on track 2 with passengers walking across track 1.

Until recently several stations on the Seetal line still used this style, although the goods tracks
have been out of use for some time.

On double track lines you typically get an island platform and these thus become tracks 3 and
4, with the numbers typically being retained even if 1 is taken out of use. Thus there is a high
prevalence of stations in Switzerland in which only tracks 3 and 4 have platforms seeing
regular use.


Andrew Moglestue
 

Always wondered why you would do that. I guess it is probably a hang-over from the very early days, when
>maybe platforms 1 and 2 where all there were.

In the early days, the railways actually made more money with goods than with passengers and the
principal purpose of small country stations was to handle and distribute goods, with passenger
functions just being an add on. Goods sheds were thus frequently larger than the station building.
Thus it is no surprise that stations were designed with goods in mind.