Question about restored historic locomotives.


John Lovda
 

I have photographed several historic locomotives that travel around on weekends. These do not appeared to be owned by SBB Historic. Some I remember are the AE6/6 Graubunden, BLS Ae6/8 208 and Ae4/7 10997. Who actually owns these? Do the owners (clubs?) have to pay for power and track usage? Where do they get parts? Is there a scrap yard they rummage through? How much help do they get from the railroad; SBB, BLS, etc?


Thanks


OL.Guerbetal
 

Am 09.04.2015 um 17:58 schrieb jlovda@yahoo.com [SwissRail]:
I have photographed several historic locomotives that travel around
on weekends. These do not appeared to be owned by SBB Historic. Some
I remember are the AE6/6 Graubunden, BLS Ae6/8 208 and Ae4/7 10997.
Who actually owns these? Do the owners (clubs?) have to pay for power
and track usage? Where do they get parts? Is there a scrap yard they
rummage through? How much help do they get from the railroad; SBB,
BLS, etc?
Over here in Europe, some things are a bit different. Railway lines are public infrastructure and against payment of an officially published fee any company, having the necessary staff and safety processes, is allowed to use this infrastructure. You may do so for running freight trains or historic passenger trains. And some clubs actually do it.

Concerning the question where they have the spare parts from, there are at least as many answers as clubs...

Markus, G�rbetal


csipromo
 

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Some of the locomotives were sold by the railway to associations and groups. Others are owned by SBB Historic but have been loaned/leased/rented to associations in exchange for the upkeep of the equipment. I don't know the exact terms, but these deals keep the locomotives in operating condition and likely ensure that the equipment is available to SBB Historic on preferential terms for excursion and ceremonial use. Some of the associations have acquired more than one locomotive and parts from one or two have been used to restore the main unit to operative condition and to provide a parts supply for future repairs.


For example, the DSF (Fricktal/Koblenz) acquired the former SOB BDe 4/4 80 from the Verein Mirage in 2010 and intended to use it as a parts source for their former WM BDe 4/4. It was then decided that it would be easier to repair the SOB BDe 4/4 than to repair the WM one, so it was put back into operating condition. Since then, they have been operating both of these units on excursions and charters.


Ae 4/7 10997 is owned by Classic Rail and is used by the Club San Gottardo for charters and excursions, primarily on the Gotthard route.


Ae 6/6 11421 Graubünden is owned by SBB Historic but was leased to a Verein that originally wanted to acquire 11403.


This site has some photos and lists many of the Vereins:
http://www.bahnbilderschweiz.ch/bilder-historisch/


Regards Mike C


John Lovda
 

Thanks Mike: I saw 10997 sitting on an industrial siding behind a factory next to the mainline Gotthard tracks in Brunnen, I believe. It looked beautiful so I knew it was special.


John