WG: articule Bulle-Broc en voie normale


bs177@...
 


Am 10.05.2014 09:41, schrieb Krist van Besien krist.vanbesien@... mailto:krist.vanbesien@...
[SwissRail]:
> Brings me to something else: With Interrail you have free travel on
> SBB, but only half price on TPF. What applies on the Romont - Bulle
> line?

Krist's comment on Interrail has alerted me to potential problems. I use SBB's online planner extensively and whilst the narrow gauge is fairly self explanatory, how is the casual user to know who provides the train service until he or she gets on the train? As many connections are a matter of a few minutes, there is insufficient time to get a ticket if you arrive at the platform and discover that the train is not the colour you were expecting.

Cheers

bruce

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


gordonwis
 

> As many connections are a matter of a few minutes, there is insufficient time to get a ticket
> if you arrive at the platform and discover that the train is not the colour you were expecting.

That's in line with what I said earlier about Interrail becoming more complicated than it was in the past.

In the past you knew pretty much what was what, especially back in the days when most lines still used there original initials and before most of the recent groupings took place.. Even where there were groupings it was comparitively easy to tell, as for example the Inter Rail list of validities would quote EBT/SMB/VHB, or BLS/BN/SEZ or 'BLS group etc


Krist van Besien
 

On 13 May 2014, at 00:35, "Gordon Wiseman gordonwis@yahoo.com [SwissRail]" <SwissRail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



As many connections are a matter of a few minutes, there is insufficient time to get a ticket
if you arrive at the platform and discover that the train is not the colour you were expecting.
That's in line with what I said earlier about Interrail becoming more complicated than it was in the past.

In the past you knew pretty much what was what, especially back in the days when most lines still used there original initials and before most of the recent groupings took place.. Even where there were groupings it was comparitively easy to tell, as for example the Inter Rail list of validities would quote EBT/SMB/VHB, or BLS/BN/SEZ or 'BLS group etc
I've asked the SBB about this, and got a prompt, and unambiguous answer. What matters is the line, not the livery. Interrailers should consult the Interrail validity map, and this shows that on Romont - Bulle you need a half price ticket, and this regardless wether you're traveling on a SBB train or a TPF train. Conversely you don't need a ticket on Fribourg - Romont, even when in a TPF train.

Krist,_._,___


bs177@...
 

> I've asked the SBB about this, and got a prompt, and unambiguous answer. What matters is
> the line, not the livery. Interrailers should consult the Interrail validity map, and this shows that
> on Romont - Bulle you need a half price ticket, and this regardless wether you're traveling on
> a SBB train or a TPF train. Conversely you don't need a ticket on Fribourg - Romont, even
> when in a TPF train.
> Krist,_._,___

Thank you for the clarification Krist. I am travelling in the area in September and had avoided the TPF train between Romont and Fribourg, in favour of the following SBB stopper. I can now revise my plans accordingly.

Cheers

Bruce

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


gordonwis
 

That seems to logically fit the 'old' pattern - namely Fribourg - Romont - tradtional SBB; Romont - Bulle - tradtional 'private' route (GFM)


Martin Baumann
 

On Wed, May 7, 2014 at 01:06 AM, Guerbetaler wrote:


The Bulle - Broc line of TPF will be regauged to standard gauge and
reelctrified a.c. instead of d.c. This allows direct passenger trains from
Bern to the Cailler chocolate factory (obviously the second "must" for
far-east visitors after the Jungfrau!) and an easier access for freight cars
to the same factory. Sugar deliveries had already gone to road transport but
might come back thanks to standard gauge rails.

The common section of the Broc and Montbovon line leaving Bulle will be with
four rails and the catenary can be switched between a.c. and d.c. power
supply.
Last day of narrow gauge operation to Broc will be 05.04.2021


Thomas
 

On the weekend of March 27/28, all trains will be operated with GFM Historique equipment, see https://www.gfm-historique.ch/?Samedi-27-mars-dimanche-28-mars

From march 25 and for several month (as items will have to be retrieved by road), there will be a display of GFM Historique stock on the industrial sidings at Broc Fabrique: Te 2/2 11 and 12 (1912), a DZ 401 or 402 postal van (1912) and two Nestlé Peter Cailler Kohler covered bogie wagons (incl. K3 653 retrieved from the bankrupt Nestlé museum in Vevey).

Rgds, Thomas.


gordonwis
 

Last day of narrow gauge operation to Broc will be 05.04.2021
Another nail in the coffin for characterful Swiss ng lines


Guerbetaler
 

Am 06.03.2021 um 15:10 schrieb gordonwis via groups.io:
> Last day of narrow gauge operation to Broc will be 05.04.2021

Another nail in the coffin for characterful Swiss ng lines
However, I prefer the idea of a railway line continuing to be operated in a rather conventional way over the inevitable closure of the very special cases. See
  • Le Locle - Les Brenets: will be replaced by bus;
  • Orbe - Chavornay: chance to survive thanks to leaving dc operation;
  • Meiringen - Innertkirchen: will survive as part of a larger system but will loose its dc particularity.

To be continued.

BTW I'd rather wish Châtel-St-Denis - St-Légier back in the ng network than Bulle - Broc. But that's my preference.

Markus, Gürbetal


Mick Sasse
 

"BTW I'd rather wish Châtel-St-Denis - St-Légier back in the ng network than Bulle - Broc. But that's my preference."

That's an interesting one, Markus. Do you think there's a fair prospect of this one? It's an obvious network gap, I would think.

Cheers
Mick


George Raymond
 

"BTW I'd rather wish Châtel-St-Denis - St-Légier back in the ng network than Bulle - Broc. But that's my preference."
That's an interesting one, Markus. Do you think there's a fair prospect of this one? It's an obvious network gap, I would think.
A trip along the line's route doesn't raise much hope:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2PHar_L85s

Even in Switzerland, once a line has been torn up, there's little chance of getting it back.

George


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Andrew Moglestue
 

Even in Switzerland, once a line has been torn up, there's little chance of getting it back.
In this particular case I would agree.

But in general, and in view of the fact that Switzerland doesn't have many closed lines, at least not compared to the likes of Britain or France, there does seem to be a quite good rate of them coming back.

Consider Limmattalbahn for example, or Oensingen Balsthal Bahn, or the Gornergrat Tramway. Okay, three wholly different situations. But nevertheless they are lines that were effectively closed but that came back in some form.

I haven't done the arithmetic, but I guess that as a percentage of total lines closed that is probably far better than Britain or France are doing for reopening lost lines.


Guerbetaler
 

Am 08.03.2021 um 12:13 schrieb Andrew Moglestue via groups.io:
Consider Limmattalbahn for example, or Oensingen Balsthal Bahn, or the Gornergrat Tramway.
OeBB has never been closed, even if there was much talk about this and the passenger offer has been reduced to peak hours. There are other lines, where such things happened, like Monthey - St-Gingolph or Apples - L'Isle. But they have never been considered "closed".

Other real reopenings, not exactly following the old route, were Niederbipp - Oensingen (ASM), Solothurn - Inkwil (- NBS) and many lines of the Genève tram network.

Markus, Gürbetal


Andrew Moglestue
 

If you want to consider recovery of closed tram routes, there is also Guisanplatz to Wankdorf in Bern, Farbhof to Schlieren in Zürich, various bits in Geneva, and if you don't mind considering deviations from the original route, trams returning to both Schwamendingen and Glattbrugg, both in Zürich (and suburbs). And cross-border tram routes in Basel. Maybe at some point also trams returning to Lugano, Lausanne and Biel and probably more things like that to follow.

When it comes to heritage and tourist railways, the DFB also deserves a very special mention.