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Zürich Rosengarten project rejected by voters


Martin Baumann
 


Guerbetaler
 

Am 09.02.2020 um 18:11 schrieb Martin Baumann:
63 % of those who voted rejected the project which would have
included a tram extension
It is very clear, that the voters didn't want to reject the tram project but the road tunnel. However, there were also doubts if the tram would have been an attractive offer because steep gradients would have limited the possible speed of the tram.


Martin Baumann
 
Edited

What would the gradient have been? The recent extension in Birmingham, England has a 9% gradient which is traversed on battery power and when I travelled on it last month speed was the same as on the level sections in the city centre.


Guerbetaler
 

Am 09.02.2020 um 23:09 schrieb Martin Baumann:
What would the gradient have been? The recent extension in
Birmingham, England has a 9% gradient which is traversed on battery
power and when I travelled on it last month speed was the same as on
the level sections in the city centre.
Indications vary between 8 and 9%. And maybe that English prescriptions are different from the Swiss prescriptions. What the retired VBZ man said, was that on such a gradient the maximum speed would be 18 km/h, depending on the brake force of the trams in Zürich.

Today the maximum gradients are 7.7% and the maximum speed on these gradients is 24 km/h.

AB Tangos are better in braking (and a bit more expensive...) than Zürich trams. They are allowed 40 km/h on 8% in the tunnel. But this is a special permission only for AB Tangos.

Maybe that the Rosengarten tramway project comes up again, dissolved from the road tunnel project... Think of it as a cautious 24 km/h operation rather than a 50 km/h race!

Markus, Gürbetal


Andrew Moglestue
 

Just some personal opinions and observations here....

IMHO the current trolleybus connection is satisfactory. The number 72 trolleybus is part of my daily commute and the acceleration on the steep sections here is pretty impressive. When a diesel bus is substituted, the difference is quite stunning. As well as the feeling of overtaking all those SUVs.

One problem is that the trolleybus often gets caused in traffic jams at peak times. A bus lane would be the obvious solution here. A tram would also need a dedicated lane so the argument that there isn't space for a bus lane doesn't really cut it.

Presently they stil use single artiuculated trolleybuss on both the 72 and the 33. Other routes such as the 31 and the 32 use double articulated trolleybuses and even so suffer from overcrowding. The project to convert the Affoltern leg of the 32 to tram is now making progress, and I'm very enthusiastic about that. But plans to do anything about Langstrasse are still in the very distant future. Ditto with the Hohlstrasse section of the 31, which would be a logical extension of the Limmattalbahn, is pretty crowded, and on which the number 2 tram is not really an alternative because many people want to go to HB.

A tram on Rosengratenstrasse would be nice to have but IMHO the projects I mentioned above are much more important. It seems to me that the desire to build a tram on Rosengartenstrasse is motivated more by symbolism than by a pressing need (as I said, they haven't even gone over to double articukated trolleybuses yet, and AFAIK don't even plan to).